Otter Pups Born at LI Aquarium

What has 16 webbed feet, four sets of delicate whiskers and one big claim to fame? Four North American river otters born last week at the Long Island Aquarium to proud parents PB and J.

Aquarium staff discovered the four pups on Saturday, February 16 during a routine visit inside the exhibit Otter Falls, which opened to the public in 2008. The pups remained secluded behind the scenes with mom—nursing, sleeping and growing.

The pups were born sometime between Friday night and Saturday morning. While it’s still very early, they all seem to be doing well and Jelly is being a fabulous mother, as expected. The otter pups and mom are inside in the holding areas of the exhibit while new daddy PB (a.k.a. Peanut Butter) is still on exhibit.

Unfortunately, they will not be visible to the public until they start moving around on their own. They will nurse for up to four months, and they won’t start moving around much on their own for at least a month or two.

To learn more about these creatures and other regional sea life, visit the Long Island Aquarium at 431 East Main Street in Riverhead, call 631-208-9200 or click on longislandaquarium.com.

What has 16 webbed feet, four sets of delicate whiskers and one big claim to fame? Four North American river otters born last week at the Long Island Aquarium to proud parents PB and J.

Aquarium staff discovered the four pups on Saturday, February 16 during a routine visit inside the exhibit Otter Falls, which opened to the public in 2008. The pups remained secluded behind the scenes with mom—nursing, sleeping and growing.

The pups were born sometime between Friday night and Saturday morning. While it’s still very early, they all seem to be doing well and Jelly is being a fabulous mother, as expected. The otter pups and mom are inside in the holding areas of the exhibit while new daddy PB (a.k.a. Peanut Butter) is still on exhibit.

Unfortunately, they will not be visible to the public until they start moving around on their own. They will nurse for up to four months, and they won’t start moving around much on their own for at least a month or two.

To learn more about these creatures and other regional sea life, visit the Long Island Aquarium at 431 East Main Street in Riverhead, call 631-208-9200 or click on longislandaquarium.com.