Review: ‘Voyeur’ Looks at Life and Loss from an Outsider’s Point of View

The Neo-Political Cowgirls’ latest production, Voyeur, which runs through Saturday, August 9, at Parsons Blacksmith Shop in Springs, is a lovely dance/theater piece that shows less is more.

Known for their immersive, expressionist productions, the Neo-Political Cowgirls have staged an impressive production that’s quite different than their last show, Eve. If Eve is an epic, sprawling tale about creation and corruption, the 20-minute Voyeur is an intimate short story, a relatable meditation on friendship, growing up and dealing with life’s many challenges.

Directed by Kate Mueth and starring Neo-Political Cowgirls regulars Graham Connor Burford, Ana Nieto, Margaret Pulkingham and others, Voyeur tells the story of two little girls (Lua Li and Tennessee King) who are best friends that drift apart due to circumstances likely beyond their control. One of the girls guides the audience around the Parsons Blacksmith Shop building, where they can see, through windows, the other little girl grow up over the course of six vignettes. With a different actress playing her in each vignette, a melancholy, troubling life unfolds before the audience’s eyes, while the guide offers intentionally vague narration that provide some context. Each vignette is a slow, deliberate dance/movement piece set to ambient music. Like Eve, the movement is highly theatrical, telling a challenging, abstract story that’s surprisingly easy to follow.

There’s no shortage of theater offerings on the East End in the summer, but Voyeur stands out as one of the most innovative and exciting, thanks to the unique, immersive production design and poignant, elegant storytelling. Voyeur’s brief run is almost over, but the short length (groups move through the piece every 20 minutes from 7–8:30 p.m.) and beautiful outdoor location make this a highly enjoyable, pleasant experience that should be seen by any lover of theater, dance and storytelling.

For more information on Voyeur and the Neo-Political Cowgirls, go to npcowgirls.org.

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